Editing Patches On a Laptop

Never say never. That expression exists for a reason. I said long ago that I would never again use digital modeling and/or digital effects. That was until I heard Zoom's B3 Bass Multi-Effects Processor.

I was more in love with the concept than the actual tone created by my Line 6 Bass Pod XT Pro. The idea of rack mounting a near infinite tone box with a PA-style power amp was a great concept that never really panned out. Instead, I was fairly happy with a couple of years of using the Bass Pod XT Pro as a preamp into my Eden WT400. The combination of the Line 6's intuitive hardware interface, endless variety of tones and tube preamp section of the Eden was rather nice and easy.

Over time, I grew tired of sterile digital and hungered for warmer, analog sounds. Further, the editing software Line 6 released for editing and sharing patches could have been an order of magnitude better and it still would have been a crash-tastic thrill ride of UI poisoning. 

To be fair, Line 6 was groundbreaking stuff when it first came out. But things have come a long way since the early 2000s. The Japanese tone scientists of Zoom have created something really special in the B3. The B3 is built like a tank, intuitive and easy to use -- and I haven't even mentioned the built in looper that is hands down easier to use than the Boss RC-2 Loop Station and the second generation Ditto from TC Electronics (I've owned both)! There is even a built in drum machine!

The UX indicates that there are two modes of using this product: 1. Experimenting, saving, and setting the order of the patches and 2. Operating the unit by foot with few to no edits while performing. By releasing Edit & Share, Zoom has made it exceptionally easy to edit patches without the need for repetitive bending over to address the knobs. Unable to test your patches at stage volume? No problem. Use studio grade headphones to really dial in your sound before you send it to the Front of House. Take a look below and you will see some cheeky but accurate iconic depictions of classic amplifiers, outboard gear and stomp boxes.

Screenshot of Edit & Go Software Connected to Zoom G5 for Guitar

Screenshot of Edit & Go Software Connected to Zoom G5 for Guitar

Being able to download patches created by a community of bass players is a great feature and one I took advantage. I found it both easy to find and install patches I found on TalkBass. And the data format for exchanging patches? Why, it is none other than plain vanilla XML. Check out the extremely clean and efficient rendering of a ModernTube tone made by a guy named CrystalMan85.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<PatchData>
  <Product>B3</Product>
  <Name>ModernTube</Name>
  <Tooltip></Tooltip>
  <Keywords></Keywords>
  <Version>1.00</Version>
  <Module0>
    <Prm0>1</Prm0>
    <Prm1>19</Prm1>
    <Prm2>13</Prm2>
    <Prm3>0</Prm3>
    <Prm4>100</Prm4>
    <Prm5>3</Prm5>
    <Prm6>100</Prm6>
    <Prm7>0</Prm7>
    <Prm8>0</Prm8>
    <Prm9>0</Prm9>
    <Prm10>0</Prm10>
  </Module0>
  <Module1>
    <Prm0>1</Prm0>
    <Prm1>72</Prm1>
    <Prm2>4</Prm2>
    <Prm3>5</Prm3>
    <Prm4>48</Prm4>
    <Prm5>3</Prm5>
    <Prm6>10</Prm6>
    <Prm7>92</Prm7>
    <Prm8>0</Prm8>
    <Prm9>0</Prm9>
    <Prm10>0</Prm10>
  </Module1>
  <Module2>
    <Prm0>1</Prm0>
    <Prm1>84</Prm1>
    <Prm2>13</Prm2>
    <Prm3>12</Prm3>
    <Prm4>10</Prm4>
    <Prm5>15</Prm5>
    <Prm6>40</Prm6>
    <Prm7>45</Prm7>
    <Prm8>3</Prm8>
    <Prm9>7</Prm9>
    <Prm10>59</Prm10>
  </Module2>
  <Module3>
    <Prm0>87</Prm0>
    <Prm1>5</Prm1>
    <Prm2>0</Prm2>
    <Prm3>4</Prm3>
    <Prm4>0</Prm4>
    <Prm5>100</Prm5>
    <Prm6>0</Prm6>
    <Prm7>10</Prm7>
    <Prm8>0</Prm8>
    <Prm9>0</Prm9>
    <Prm10>0</Prm10>
  </Module3>
  <Module4>
    <Prm0>0</Prm0>
    <Prm1>0</Prm1>
    <Prm2>0</Prm2>
    <Prm3>0</Prm3>
    <Prm4>0</Prm4>
    <Prm5>0</Prm5>
    <Prm6>0</Prm6>
    <Prm7>0</Prm7>
    <Prm8>0</Prm8>
    <Prm9>0</Prm9>
    <Prm10>0</Prm10>
  </Module4>
</PatchData>
Blissed Out Making and Storing Patches

Blissed Out Making and Storing Patches